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JOHN STUBBS

B.S., Louisiana State, 1972; M.S.H.P., Columbia, 1974; UNESCO Fellow at International Centre for the Study of the Conservation of Cultural Property (ICCROM (Rome); Attingham Summer School (London); Salzburg Seminar Fellow/Faculty.

John Stubbs serves as Vice President for Field Projects at the World Monuments Fund (New York) where he plays a lead role in planning and coordinating a number of the organization's key architectural conservation projects and related activities. He is an overseer of WMF's World Monuments Watch program he and other colleagues at WMF are responsible for tracking progress and stimulating positive conservation actions at over 250 sites in 92 countries.

Prior to joining WMF in 1990 John Stubbs served for ten years as Assistant Director of Historic Preservation Projects under James Marston Fitch at Beyer Blinder Belle, Architects and Planners in New York City that specializes in historic preservation projects. In 1978-79 he served as Historical Architect for the Technical Preservation Services Division of the U.S. Department of Interior in Washington, D.C.

Since 1984 John H. Stubbs has taught four courses in Historic Preservation in Columbia University's Graduate School of Architecture Planning and Preservation. He presently teaches International Architectural Preservation Practice each Spring semester. Professor Stubbs has taught at two other universities, served for six years Trustee, Archaeological Institute of America, and since 1988 served as a trustee of the James Marston Fitch Charitable Foundation where he was elected as its chairman in 2007.

John Stubbs is Vice President for Field Projects for the World Monuments Fund in New York and is in charge of planning and coordinating a number of the organization's key architectural conservation projects and related activities in several countries.  As a principle overseer of WMF’s World Monuments Watch program he and his staff are responsible for tracking progress and stimulating positive conservation actions at over 250 sites in 86 countries.    Prior to joining WMF in 1990 John Stubbs served for ten years as Assistant Director of Historic Preservation Projects at Beyer Blinder Belle, Architects and Planners in New York City. In 1978-79 he worked as an Historical Architect for the Technical Preservation Services Division of the U.S. Department of the Interior in Washington, D.C. helping to administer federal tax incentives for rehabilitating historic buildings. He is a graduate of Columbia University's Graduate Program in Historic Preservation and attended the International Centre for the Conservation of Cultural Property in Rome (ICCROM) as a UNESCO Fellow.    John Stubbs is also an Adjunct Associate Professor of Historic Preservation in Columbia University's Graduate Program in Historic Preservation where he teaches a course in International Architectural Conservation Practice. He has served as Trustee of the Archaeological Institute of America and is presently Chairman of the James Marston Fitch Charitable Foundation.    Professor Stubbs recently completed a book entitled Time Honored; A Global View of Architectural Conservation (John Wiley & Sons) that one of its reviewers said: “…only John Stubbs could have written since he has traveled the world and participated in or observed contemporary architectural conservation practice probably more than any other person.”

DAMIAN EVANS

Damian Evans is a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Archaeology Department at the University of Sydney, Australia, and the current Director of the University’s Research Centre in Siem Reap, Cambodia. A specialist in the application of digital methods (including remote sensing and GIS spatial analysis) to historical problems of urbanism and the environment in Cambodia, he is one of the founding members of the Greater Angkor Project and has worked in Cambodia for over ten years in that role. His recently completed PhD focussed on collating historical sources and using airborne imaging radar to re-map the urban landscape of Angkor, and he now holds a three year grant from the Australian Research Council to pursue similar studies at different sites within the former Khmer Empire and undertake a regional comparative study. He is a longstanding affiliate of the Electronic Cultural Atlas Initiative (ECAI) and has been involved in numerous projects in that capacity since 2001.

JULIAN BENNETT

Julian Bennett received his Ph.D. in Archaeology from the University of Newcastle upon Tyne in 1991, and has taught at Bilkent University, Ankara since 1995. His areas of expertise are Roman provincial and military archaeology, and the archaeology and architecture of Late Roman and Byzantine Anatolia. His fieldwork experience extends from rural and urban salvage excavations in Britain and Germany to current research projects and excavations in Romania and Turkey. He was elected a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries in 2002.

DR. KHAIRIEH AMR

Dr. Khairieh Amr is a senior Archaeologist and Deputy Director for Technical and Scientific Affairs at the Jordan National Museum Project. As former editor of the Annual Department of Antiquities of Jordan (ADAJ); she has published more than 60 articles and worked on over 30 archaeological field projects at different sites in Jordan (13 of which Amr directed). Dr. Amr has given many lectures and appeared on Digging for the Truth: Lost Treasures of Petra for the US History Channel.

ED MCCANN

Ed McCann is a director of a Civil Engineering company, Expedition Engineering based in London. He has been studying Civil Engineering for 20 years, and is currently in charge of the 2012 Olympics Velodrome and the North Shore Footbridge. He is a Chartered Engineer, a fellow of the Royal Society of Arts, and a member of the Chartered Institution of Water and Environmental Managers. He has made a number of television programs about ancient engineering practices across the Mediterranean, and has a keen interest in historical engineering and building practices.

SUSAN A. NILES

Susan A. Niles has written on Inca architecture and culture history, and has also written about North American vernacular architecture.    She is the author of four books, including two on the Incas:  Callachaca, Style and Status in an Inca Community and The Shape of Inca History:  Narrative and Architecture in an Andean Empire.   She has written numerous articles on Precolumbian subjects, including, most recently, “The Nature of Inca Royal Estates,” in Machu Picchu:  Unveiling the Mystery of the Incas.  Niles holds a Ph..D in anthropology from the University of California, and is Professor of Anthropology at Lafayette College in Easton, Pennsylvania.

VINCE LEE

Vince Lee is a Princeton-trained architect and hay farmer in McElmo Canyon, near Cortez, Colorado, following four decades of professional practice throughout the northern Rockies.  A long-standing member of the American Alpine Club, he logged over thirty seasons as an alpine mountain guide and led numerous mountaineering expeditions  worldwide prior to engaging his current passion for archaeology.  Benefiting from 25 years of exploration, mapping and research in the high Andes of Peru, Ecuador and Bolivia, he is a veteran member of the Institute of Andean Studies at Berkeley, a Fellow of the New York Explorers Club and a Research Associate with the San Diego Museum of Man.  His work has been featured in various TV documentary series, including NOVA and the National Geographic and History Channels.  In addition to numerous papers and monographs, he is author of the definitive "Forgotten Vilcabamba, Final Stronghold of the Incas.

PETER FROST

Peter Frost is author of the Peruvian guidebook Exploring Cusco, the Insight Pocket Guides to both Peru and Ecuador (both text and photos), and has just completed updating and rewriting the Insight Guide to Peru, which also features many of his photos. He wrote the text and supplied photos for the Peruvian photo book, Machu Picchu Historical Sanctuary (1995), and wrote the accompanying text for Hijos del Sol (2007), an Argentine coffee table book about the Andes.

In 2001/2002 he led National Geographic-sponsored expeditions responsible for the scientific discovery and exploration of the archaeological site of Qoriwayrachina (see NYT Science, 3/19/02 and NYT International, page A3, 5/13/2004). His story of the discovery was published in National Geographic magazine (Mystery Mountain of the Inca, Feb., 2004). 

He has featured in many documentary films and shows about the Andes, including the following:
Interview: “Ancient Discoveries”, the History Channel, filmed 2008.  (To be shown).
Interview: “Machu Picchu: Digging for the Truth, with Josh Bernstein”; The History Channel, aired 2007.
Interview: “Journeys from the Center of the Earth”, BBC Science, aired March, 2006.
Interview: “The Amazon Explorers: Hiram Bingham”; the History Channel, 2005.
Interview: “Paititi: Digging for the Truth, with Josh Bernstein”; The History Channel, aired February, 2005.
Interview and Production: “Modern Marvels: Machu Picchu”; The History Channel; aired September, 2003
TV Interview: (in Spanish) live on Canal-N, Peruvian cable channel, Lima, with Raúl Tola; November 21st, 2002.
TV Interview & Documentary: National Geographic Channel, “Inca Mummies – Secrets of a Lost Empire”; first aired May 2002
TV Interview: NBC Today Show, “Where in the World is Matt Lauer”, live at Machu Picchu; May 7th, 2001

Mr. Frost has lived for 21 years in the Andean city of Cusco, where he travels with National Geographic Expeditions as an accompanying expert. He also leads treks and expeditions for the US travel company, Wilderness Travel. "
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